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Now you can "Enter The System" if you like
Now you can "Enter The System" if you like
Posted by Gizmo on January 17, 2008 :

Stanton SC System NAMM 2008

Some time ago, I predicted that the future of DJing was taking the function away from the hardware and making it all software based, with dumb controllers working the software on laptops. It's always seemed wasteful and not really in the consumers' interests to have to splash out on all new decks and mixers when much of the improvement should really just be a software tweak. So bugger me if that's exactly what Stanton have gone and done. Enter the SC System.


What Stanton have made with the SC System is to fully integrate the laptop into the DJ experience, and handing over much of the function to the software, but have brand new DJ friendly controllers mimic the established DJ metaphor. But it's not limiting you to using these surfaces in one particular way - you can still use them with regular mixers and decks via the FS Open interface that does all the talking to the software. But such is the openness and flexibility of this system that it's been designed to talk with all sorts of software on Mac and PC rather than limiting you to proprietary software. Total flexibility is the key to the SC System.

So let's take a look at the new controllers:

SCS.1m mix Controller

Stanton SC System NAMM 2008

Stanton SC System NAMM 2008

click for hi res

• The world’s premier mixer control surface for laptop DJs and remixers
• Familiar 4-channel design with intuitive high-precision metering
• Assignable Encoder section with 360° of LED feedback
• LCD “scribble strips” for two-way communication with selected DJ software
• Easy controller mapping into popular DJ and VJ software
• Navigation section for remote browsing through playlists
• Mic and Phono / Line input for sampling, archiving vinyl, and remixing
• Built-in FireWire connections with full Mac and Windows compatibility
• Perfect as a standalone mix controller, or in combination with SCS.1d deck
• Balanced, studio-quality TRS output for mains; RCA booth output and 1/4˝ headphones output
• Unique footswitch input enabling hands-free control of software parameters

Faders / Encoders
• 24 Potentiometers (MIDI CC)
• 4 Virtual-pots with 18 segment LED rings (MIDI CC or Incremental CC)
• 4 45mm Linefaders (MIDI CC)
• 1 45mm Crossfader (MIDI CC)
• 1 Rotary encoder (MIDI CC or Incremental CC)

Displays
• 4 Multicolor 8 character alphanumeric LCDs with contrast control (MIDI SysEX controllable)
• 6 9-segment LED meters. One for each channel, one L&R pair for master (controllable via MIDI)

Buttons / Switches
• 37 Momentary backlit pushbuttons (MIDI Note On)

Dimensions
• 5.96 lbs / 2.71 kg
• 3˝H x 10.75˝W x 16.75˝L

Audio
Frequency Response (20Hz - 20kHz): +/- 0.2dB
THD+N (at 1kHz): 0.013%
Signal to Noise Ratio (A-weighted): 105.1dB
Sampling Rates: 44.1kHz, 48kHz, 96kHz
Audio Format: 16-bit, 24-bit
Latency (roundtrip): <5 ms

Inputs / Outputs (Max Level)
Phono / Line Input: 2 (RCA) Phono / Line switchable, +21dBu unbalanced
Microphone Input: 1 (1/4”) @ +9.1dBV unbalanced
Balanced Output: 2 (1/4”) @ +27.7dBu
RCA Output: 2 (RCA) @ +21.5dBu
Headphone Output: 1 (1/4”)
Footswitch Input: 1 (1/4”)

Power
Voltage / Amps: 12V DC / 3.0


Stanton SC System NAMM 2008

Stanton SC System NAMM 2008

click for hi res

SCS.1d Deck

• Flagship deck controller for laptop DJs and remixer / producers
• Adjustable high-torque 10” motorized platter with vinyl surface and superior tracking
• 100mm motorized pitch fader with recall for sync with software
• Velocity-sensitive pads assingable to loops, cue points, etc.
• Assignable Encoder section with 360° of LED feedback
• LCD “scribble strips” for two-way communication with selected software
• Familiar Tansport section for direct music control
• Perfect for adding maximum control capabilities into existing DJ software
• Easily controls multiple virtual decks for powerful multi-channel mixes

Compatible Software:

• Traktor Studio
• Ableton
• MixVibes
• Deckadance

...and other MIDI-compatible DJ/VJ software (obviously).

Faders / Encoders
• 4 Virtual-pots with 18 segment LED rings (MIDI CC or Incremental CC)
• 1 100mm Motorized fader (MIDI CC)

Buttons / Switches
• 4 Velocity sensitive trigger pads (MIDI Note On)
• 46 Momentary backlit push buttons (MIDI Note On)

Displays
• 4 Multicolor 8 character alphanumeric LCDs with contrast control (MIDI SysEX Controllable)
• 1 Cue position display with current deck indicator (MIDI SysEX controllable)

Dimensions
• 13.88 lbs / 6.29 kg• 3.25˝H x 14.5˝W x 16.75˝L

Motorized Platter
Motor Type: 16 pole, 3 phase, brushless DC motor
Speeds: 33 1/3 rpm, 45 rpm
Starting Torque: >4.5 kgf.cm
Starting Time: 0.2 sec
Braking Time: 0.2 sec

Power
Voltage / Amps: 24V DC / 3.0


Stanton SC System NAMM 2008

4 years in the making, this is pretty special stuff. It's big steps towards a totally pick n mix modular approach to DJ setup building that allows you to define functions on your decks and mixer, and importantly get feedback from your software as well. It could be argued that this has in some way been possible with MIDI mixers and controllers for a while, but never before in this standard DJ metaphor. DJs favouring a more conventional approach to DJing but with the benefits of MP3 and software can now have just that.

For me, the SC.1d is perhaps the most exciting part of the setup. It's generally agreed that the holy grail of digital audio manipulation is vinyl like feel. The Numark CDX brought us that but in a massive case and still only using CDs. The subsequent HDX gave us a hard drive, but a huge price tag as well as the still huge form factor. Pioneer and Denon took a different approach and gave us a small form factor and pretty good feel but Technics failed with their DZ deck - nuff said. but people seemed to want something between the 2 - a smaller form factor but a close feel to vinyl, and it seems that the SC.1d does just that.

But not only that, that ability to define your own features on the SC.1d as well. I love hot cues - the idea of being able to bash out instant remixes appeals more to me than say effects on a digital deck. But that might not be what somebody else likes. But now it doesn't matter - you can change what you want and get feedback from the SC.1d without having to look at your laptop.

I think this is just the beginning for Stanton and their SC System. I'll be sending the USA NAMM floor force to play and get pics and footage.

More info: Stanton


NOTE: No further comments are being accepted.
21 comments to this story

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, GIANA BROTHERZ said this:
looks good!
can t wait to test it!
big up STANTON!
blink1.gif

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, Esca said this:
Very good!!!

I think the SCS.1d will be part of my setup very soon...it's good to use it with mixvibes and still have both of the vinyl free to be used...

Good job Stanton, good job...

Esca - NeedleVandals
www.myspace.com/needlevandals

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, ROSTA said this:
Looks OK why not a 12" platter an Why not a full spindle ????

ABOUT FUCKIN TIME someone pulled out something like this ???

hats off for trying looks OKish

still pref technics an a dvs

Any day smile.gif

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, meepbeep said this:
where do stanton want to sell this ? toys r us ?

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, ROSTA said this:
LOL

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, BattleFunk said this:
was there supposed to be a website with this, or just a count down clock? i just get a blank page when i go to the link.

i dont think this system is anything to write home about. its something that would have been ground breaking a few years ago. theres too many things in this new setup that can be done with midi a dvs and a controller already

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, Solo said this:
Why are you putting down a midi-controller with a direct-drive disc-platter? It offers a lot of functions not available on the S5500 and other controllers.

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, MasterBlaster said this:
So, what are we talking about $$$-wise?

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, BattleFunk said this:
quote:
"Why are you putting down a midi-controller with a direct-drive disc-platter? It offers a lot of functions not available on the S5500 and other controllers."


if that was at me (try using the quotes), I'm not putting anything down, I'm simply pointing out it could have been done a couple of years ago and been worth the hype.

a spinning platter isnt all that, i had a dz1200 and i can do more on a cdj1000 than i could with a 'direct drive platter'. has anyone seen that DJ Disk footage were he kills it with the motor off on the deck? (I cant believe i just used him as a reference after he ripped me off)

it does offer other functions in comparison to the other units, but i didnt compare it with them?

should be a nice product for mobile jocks

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, rasteri said this:
It looks awesome!

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, ROGAN said this:
i wonder if you can use the turntables with serato ? What do you all think?

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, J.J. said this:
Who are the designers at Stanton?

I could of done a better job on the layout in my sleep. The ergonomics are just awful. What a mess.

10" dot DD platter is the only thing that is good.

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, RodrigoSM.br said this:
Finally some new stuff. Controllers are all the rage now, and it's been very very boring to watch.
Only one thing though - what kind of MIDI message does the spinning platter send? And what's the pitch fader resolution (how many steps)? It would be really really cool to have a long throw, high resolution fader control the software. I'll just set the range to +/- 3% and live happily with it ever after.
Nicely done, Stanton. Thought you guys were on your last legs. Now please fix your carts, and I will very quickly stop knocking on your stuff.

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, nem0nic said this:
quote:
"Only one thing though - what kind of MIDI message does the spinning platter send? And what's the pitch fader resolution (how many steps)? It would be really really cool to have a long throw, high resolution fader control the software. I'll just set the range to +/- 3% and live happily with it ever after."

The controllers aren't necessarily MIDI controllers. They can "speak" different protocols, MIDI being one. So if you're using an app that only supports MIDI, and only does 7bit CC data, then that control will have 128 steps. If that app supports the SC directly, they won't speak MIDI at all and use another communication protocol isntead, which will enable the SC to utilize much higher resolution.

It's flexible and open.

{subject}
On January 17, 2008, tobamai said this:
I'm glad to see a product like this finally making it to market. To those of us who use a midi controller in our setup it seems like a no brainer - cut the timecode out of the picture entirely for the sake of reliability, troubleshooting, ease of use, cabling, and (hopefully) price point.

To those who aren't using a midi controller with their dvs it probably looks like a toy. If you don't like it, don't buy it.

Kudos to Stanton for releasing a serios controller only deck. Seems like an obviously great idea to a lot of us, but there's enough hard headed 'old-skool' djs who are going to give them flak for this product.

{subject}
On January 18, 2008, Wozza said this:
I would like to know how well it could perform with decks and Serato. I would like a midi controller or two for the loops but something like this would be great to allow me to just take controllers out when traveling. this would save my back more as my Stantons way a ton.
I might still be waiting a little while longer but we will see

{subject}
On January 18, 2008, Louis D. said this:
Personally, I think this stuff is pretty interesting, and this is certainly an interesting angle that Stanton is trying to work here. I can see how some of this stuff could have a useful application in some settings. Like a fixed studio setup.

However, where it falls short is that it still requires a computer. In this day in age, computers are constantly getting better and faster. Software is also getting very demanding on CPU resources, as developers push the limits of concepts that are only limited by their minds and programming capability.

Nobody is denying the power behind computers, and how they've changed forever the way we think about DJing. But is everyone really content with DJing's growing reliance on computers, especially in the field? I just brought my laptop to a club the other day, and the sub bass was literally so loud that the vibrations made my hard drive fail. Not only that, but setting up equipment when you want to play out isn't any less of a hassle than it's been in the past, especially when you play a short set alongside of other DJs.

When it comes down to it, I've grown to appreciate the functionality that digital DJing and TCV systems provide. I've been using a number of DVS systems, and have grown to rely on them. But on the same token, I've grown to hate them because of the unpredictable nature of computers in regards to stability, the hassle of setting it all up when I play out, and the expense and worry of using a laptop in a not-so-friendly environment (ie a nightclub).

I was for sure we were going to see some more embedded systems-driven pieces this year. That is, units that are driven by special-purpose computer systems which are limited to the necessary functions (in this case, audio reproduction, DSP, routing). This is how Cortex works, also the new Pioneer units.

Call me crazy, but I just don't see why the industry is insistent on perpetuating the reliance on laptops. Anything you can do on a laptop you can do with an embedded system. Do you think the medical industry relies on Windows or OSX for medical devices? Granted this isn't medicine and we aren't doctors, but that doesn't mean we should settle for less.

</rant>

{subject}
On January 18, 2008, nem0nic said this:
quote:
"Call me crazy, but I just don't see why the industry is insistent on perpetuating the reliance on laptops. Anything you can do on a laptop you can do with an embedded system. Do you think the medical industry relies on Windows or OSX for medical devices? Granted this isn't medicine and we aren't doctors, but that doesn't mean we should settle for less."

Well that was a great post.

If I were to guess an answer to your question, it would be a pretty obvious one. I think developers are leveraging user's computers because it's cheaper to develop "dumb" products. It allows them to release products with insane feature sets for very little cost. Imagine how expensive a hardware version of SSL would be if it retained all the same features. Now take that and think instead about Torq or Traktor or Mixvibes, where even more functionality is involved.

A recently released product that kind of parallels this is the Tascam X-48 multitrack recorder. It's a hardware based recorder with great functionality for it's price (even does VSTs and records to broadcast .wav for easy import into apps like ProTools). It took Tascam close to 5 years to get this thing right. It SEEMS like an easy proposition (Hell, it's basically just a stripped down Windows computer with audio I/O), but they agonized over that thing.

And actually, yes. The medical industry relies heavily on Windows, as does the broadcast industry and many others. The difference is that its stripped down and locked so users can't jeopardize it's stability.

{subject}
On January 18, 2008, Louis D. said this:
quote:
"And actually, yes. The medical industry relies heavily on Windows, as does the broadcast industry and many others. The difference is that its stripped down and locked so users can't jeopardize it's stability."


I would put money on any medical life support systems out there being Linux embedded systems and nothing else. I know I wouldn't want my life to be in the hands of Windows, I don't care if it's stripped down or not! :P

{subject}
On January 20, 2008, renatojsp said this:
I will keep my HDX with torq and wait from behringer DDM4000 because the price is out of mind.



from http://namm.harmony-central.com/WNAMM08/Content/StantonDJ/PR/SC-System.html

The Stanton SC System is expected to ship in May 2008, and the retail value of the full system will be set at a retail value of approximately $2,499.00 (MSRP). The units will also be sold separately, with the SCS.1.d set at $1,499.00 (MSRP) and the SCS.1m at $999.00 (MSRP).

{subject}
On July 29, 2010, buckner said this:
I've finally entered the matrix, ehr umm System

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCnWtr5ql2s







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